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Pixar’s ‘Inside Out’ Trailer: Emotions Battle It Out

Pixar’s upcoming movie Inside Out looks really cute.

The idea of personifying a bunch of emotions is pretty creative and unique, unlike the direction Pixar is taking with all their planned sequels, like Toy Story 4 and The Incredibles 2. (It reminds me a little of Osmosis Jones, although that movie had more to do with bodily functions than emotions.)

Inside Out is only the second Pixar movie to feature a female protagonist. Riley Anderson is described as an 11-year-old girl from Minnesota who loves hockey and has to move with her family to San Francisco, California. These changes in her life cause all sorts of different, conflicting emotions: Joy (Amy Poehler), Sadness (Phyllis Smith), Fear (Bill Hader), Disgust (Mindy Kaling), and Anger (Lewis Black).

In the 2-minute trailer above, we see that Riley’s parents have their own personified emotions struggling to deal with their daughter’s behavior and each other’s reactions. In fact, her mom’s emotions — with Sadness being at the forefront — look like the set of The View. I’m not a fan of Inside Out employing the stereotypical sitcom parents — the self-aware mom and the bumbling, dumb dad. (Something tells me these ones could be headed for divorce.) But at least Riley doesn’t appear to be a gender stereotype.

Growing up can be a bumpy road, and it’s no exception for Riley, who is uprooted from her Midwest life when her father starts a new job in San Francisco. Like all of us, Riley is guided by her emotions — Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness. The emotions live in Headquarters, the control center inside Riley’s mind, where they help advise her through everyday life. As Riley and her emotions struggle to adjust to a new life in San Francisco, turmoil ensues in Headquarters. Although Joy, Riley’s main and most important emotion, tries to keep things positive, the emotions conflict on how best to navigate a new city, house and school.

Inside Out opens June 19, 2015.

  • jboy61

    it’s a blatant rip off of Osmosis Jones in my mind. My guess is that the people at Pixar either wanted to “re-imagine” the film for their own gain or none of the creative team didn’t see O.J.